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Decorative eggs by Rosemary Algie

7 April 2007

The symbology of the egg continues to expand as it is applied to new innovations and its use is unearthed in more ancient discoveries. Yet at this time of year, its relevance as a symbol of Easter is particularly obvious as shops fill their shelves with Easter eggs of all sizes and colours. Yet these Easter eggs with their bright wrappings and decorated exteriors will soon be consumed and become only sweet memories. Rosemary Algie’s beautifully fashioned decorative eggs, however, are made to be a feast for the eyes that will last for years and years.

 

 

 

Rosemary

with a display of the steps taken

to produce he decorative eggs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Careful work 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fine découpage decorating

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step by step

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

closeup

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An egg tree

 

 

 

 

 

Rosemary's Story

The symbology of the egg continues to expand as it is applied to new innovations and its use is unearthed in more ancient discoveries. Yet at this time of year, its relevance as a symbol of Easter is particularly obvious as shops fill their shelves with Easter eggs of all sizes and colours.

Yet these Easter eggs with their bright wrappings and decorated exteriors will soon be consumed and become only sweet memories. Rosemary Algie's beautifully fashioned decorative eggs, however, are made to be a feast for the eyes that will last for years and years.

Rosemary tells, "Having been a primary school teacher, I have always been able to apply my sense of creativity to the teaching of arts and crafts to children. I have practiced a number of art forms such as flower arranging, creative needlework, and of course decorative eggs."

There is a fundamental difference between Rosemary's decorated eggs and other decorative eggs, and the secret lies inside the egg. Rosemary prepares the egg with a cutaway section, like an oval window, that gives a view into a little world that she creates as a scene or design, using the inside of the shell as a concave skyline.

It took many years of experimentation with processes and techniques for Rosemary to develop this method. "Even with practice, it remains a challenging art form as the fine work and delicate egg shells require much care and patience" she stresses." I need to treat the egg shells to harden them before I can start work. Then comes cutting and shaping before the decorating can even begin". With all this preparation, the eggs end up far less fragile that they appear to be.

Rosemary adds the images to the eggs using decoupage techniques. Working through the window on the inside of the egg requires special care. She adds other trimmings to complete the scene and introduce further charm into these little worlds. Rosemary's egg collection features a number of themes and new ones appear periodically.

"I never really grew up." says Rosemary, "and am still a child at heart, a true fairy person". It is little wonder, therefore, that she was attracted to the making of decorative eggs. They capture that very image of a fairy world - a little world encapsulated in an egg shell. "The only time I have ever seen a similar form of decorative eggs was on the Ilse of Wight many years ago," she adds.

 

 

 

Last Updated 02 April 2014 10:23